Babysitters & Nannies - Granville

We have a network of trusted local carers ready to connect with you. Whether it’s one-off babysitting, nannying or before & after school care, Juggle Street is here to help.

Are you endlessly Juggling work and family?

Discover keen & trustworthy carers just around the corner from you, and start adding them to your network.
With the click of a button, post out a job to one or many of your favourite carers.

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Do you love kids?

Helping out a neighbour is a super-convenient way to earn some extra money close to home.
Join the Juggle Street network to start receiving SMS job invitations.

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Granville is located 22 kilometres (14 mi) west of the Sydney central business district, split between the local government areas of Cumberland Council and the City of Parramatta. South Granville is a separate suburb with the distinguishing feature of a light industrial area. Lisgar, Redfern, Heath and Mona Streets form the approximate border between Granville and South Granville. The Duck River provides a boundary with Auburn, to the east.

Granville was named in 1880, after the British Colonial Secretary, the Granville Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville. The area evolved primarily after 1855, when it became the final stop of the first railway line of New South Wales. The Sydney-Parramatta Line ran from Sydney terminus, just south from today's Central railway station to the Granville area which was originally known as 'Parramatta Junction'. This led to the development of this area, which attracted speculators and some local industries.

In the early days of European settlement, timber was harvested to fuel the steam engines in Sydney and Parramatta. By the 1860s, the supply of timber was exhausted. The remainder was used by scavengers who made a living by collecting firewood. Wattle bark found use with tanners and the bark from stringybarktrees was used for roofing of huts. In 1862, a major estate, Drainville, became subject to a mortgagee sale and subdivided for villa homes, and small agricultures. At the end of the decade a Tweed Mill was established, which was steam powered using water from the Duck River.