Babysitters & Nannies - Dee Why

We have a network of trusted local carers ready to connect with you. Whether it’s one-off babysitting, nannying or before & after school care, Juggle Street is here to help.

Are you endlessly Juggling work and family?

Discover keen & trustworthy carers just around the corner from you, and start adding them to your network.
With the click of a button, post out a job to one or many of your favourite carers.

JOIN AS PARENT
Do you love kids?

Helping out a neighbour is a super-convenient way to earn some extra money close to home.
Join the Juggle Street network to start receiving SMS job invitations.

JOIN AS CARER

It is the administrative centre of the local government area of Northern Beaches Council and, along with Brookvale, is considered to be the main centre of the Northern Beaches region. The reasons for Dee Why's name remain unclear. The earliest reference to it is a pencil note in surveyor James Meehan's field book, "Wednesday, 27th Sept, 1815 Dy Beach - Marked a Honey Suckle Tree near the Beach". What it meant to him is not clear, but various claims have been put forward, including: 1. The letters DY were simply a marker that Meehan used to mark many other places on his map. 2. The name came from the local Aboriginal language that Meehan used to name many of the locations that he surveyed.

From 1840 the name was recorded as one word, 'Deewhy'. The term 'Dee Why' was also used to name 'Dee Why Heights' or Highlands, known as Narraweenasince 1951, and 'Dee Why West', the name of which was changed to Cromer in 1969. The first land in the area to be listed by the New South Wales government Gazette was 700 acres (280 ha) granted to William Cossar in the early 19th century, James Wheeler purchased 90 acres in 1842, but by the mid-19th century most of the land in what is now Dee Why had been acquired by James Jenkins and other members of the Jenkins family.

Public transport in Dee Why primarily runs along Pittwater Road in the form of buses, with services southwards to the City, Manly and North Sydney, and northwards to Collaroy, Cromer, Narrabeen, and the Pittwater area. The main bus stop for these services is located at the intersection with Howard Avenue. There are also semi-regular services to Chatswood via McInstosh Road to the west, as well as to Manly via Freshwater. Two express services to the city also run from near Dee Why Beach in the early morning and back from the city in the afternoon to serve commuters on weekdays.