Babysitters & Nannies - Northbridge

We have a network of trusted local carers ready to connect with you. Whether it’s one-off babysitting, nannying or before & after school care, Juggle Street is here to help.

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Do you love kids?

Helping out a neighbour is a super-convenient way to earn some extra money close to home.
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It is located 7 kilometres north of the Sydney Central Business District, in the local government area of Willoughby. Long Gully Bridge, linking the suburb to Cammeray, has become a recognised symbol of Northbridge, completed in January 1892 and purchased by the state government in 1912.

The suburb celebrated its centenary in 2013. Northbridge took its name from its location, north of a sandstone suspension bridge built in 1892. It was constructed by a team of land developers at a cost of 42,000 pounds and originally known as North Sydney Bridge. The engineer responsible for the construction was J.E.Coyle and the style was Federation Gothic, with medieval motifs as "unexpected embellishments". It has been known as the Northbridge and Cammeray Suspension Bridge but is now called the Long Gully Bridge.

The land where the suspension bridge was built belonged to William Twemlow, a Sydney jeweller. In 1868 he purchased the land extending from Fig Tree Point to the head of Long Bay, (now Northbridge). He initially regarded the land as valueless but changed his mind when he made a handsome profit by selling some of it to an English syndicate who built the suspension bridge. Twemlow decided to build a two storey home called The Hermitage, on Fig Tree Point, from sandstone quarried on the estate, which took a year to cut. As this was the first house built in this locality, transport was a problem and Twemlow had to sail through The Spit and around Middle Head to Circular Quay, from where he walked to his shop at Sydney Arcade. Northbridge Post Office opened on 25 November 1920.